Still Knitting … but Secret Knitting

We’ve been having summer-like weather in Maine for the last few weeks. I’m not going to be popular when I say that I would rather have cold, fall weather. But this is New England and it’ll change. This I know for sure. In fact, tomorrow we’re expecting rain and wind and then we’re supposed to get some cooler weather. One customer today even said that she’d heard snow on Wednesday.

I’m knitting away like crazy. At this time of year I always am. I used to plan to make something knitted for everyone in the family. Those days are over because it was killing me. Not everyone wants or needs something that I knit and I’ve stopped knitting like a crazy woman before Christmas.

This year I’m making a Christmas stocking and a Christmas sweater for my granddaughter and a hat for my daughter (and another as a surprise for someone very special.) I’m going to have twenty hours in the car when we go to my bonus daughter’s wedding in Washington, DC in early December. I’m hoping that by the time we’re in the car that I will be able to knit a vest or sweater for myself in the car. I only have a minimum of five sweaters’ worth of yarn that I need to knit.

That said, let’s talk about what I can talk about.

I’m knitting three “plain” stockings for my cousin Joan who had a moth infestation. The moths destroyed her childhood stocking and a couple of others. When she called to ask me if she could commission me to knit some new stockings I couldn’t say no. So, I found some green, red and white worsted weight yarn and did a bit of pattern research. I decided to use the traditional intarsia patterns, take away the intarsia and the decreases to the heel and knit a simple stocking.

I cast on 60 stitches and knitted the leg of the stocking flat starting with 7 or 8 rows of 2×2 ribbing and then changing to stockinette stitch (knit on the right side and purl on the wrong side.) The reason that stockings are so often seamed up the back of the leg is because they really need some structure and strength there in order to be able to hold the weight of the Christmas morning goodies (if you’ve been very good!) I knitted 84 rows of stockinette stitch (or about 12 inches) and then joined to knit in the round. The first 15 and last 15 stitches become the heel stitches and the next step is the heel flap. On the right side, slip 1, knit 1 across and on the wrong side, slip 1 and purl the rest of the stitches to the end of the row. The last row should be a right side row. When the heel flap is 2 1/2 inches long, we’ll turn the dreaded heel.

Basically, if you’ve noticed, this is the exact same process as knitting a sock but with worsted weight yarn. Not rocket science. Not scary. Just follow the simple steps and trust the pattern. Mine is a very loose pattern, it’s not tech edited or tested. Beware if you choose to follow it. LOL.

Heel turning: on the wrong side, slip 1 stitch, purl 17, purl 2 together, purl 1 and turn. Slip 1 stitch, knit 5, knit 2 together, knit 1, turn. From here on, look at your knitting and slip the first stitch, purl to one stitch before the gap (that’ll be six stitches purled after the slipped stitch), purl the stitches on either side of the gap together, knit one and turn. Now you’ll do similarly on the knit side … slip 1, knit to the gap (7 sts.), knit two together, knit 1 and turn. You’ll continue to slip 1, purl to the gap, purl the two stitches together (one from either side of the gap) and purl 1 then turn and knit back as you’ve been doing. Do this back and forth until all of the stitches are used up. Ending with a knit row.

Gusset time! Pick up and knit 12 stitches down the side of the gusset. Each of the slipped stitches leaves a pretty clear place to pick up stitches. Knit across the 30 stitches on the top of the foot. Last, you’ll pick up and knit another 12 stitches up the side of the second side of the gusset and then knit across 9 of the heel stitches. Knit once around the stocking and then every other round will be a decrease round: at the bottom of the first side of the gusset you’ll knit 2 together, knit across the top of the foot and then knit two together at the top of the second gusset side, knit to the end of the round. The decreases are on either side of the top of the foot only in this part. Once you are back to the original number of stitches, you just knit around and around until the foot measures four inches from the heel flap edge.

Now there’s only the toe to knit. Again, the decrease rounds will be every other round until there are 28 stitches and then every round until there are 12 stitches. The decreases are in four places on the toe. The beginning of the round is at the middle of the bottom of the foot. Knit 12, knit 2 together, knit 2, knit 2 together, knit 24, knit 2 together, knit 2, knit 2 together, knit 12. You can place markers, use DPNs, whatever works … you are the boss of your knitting! If you’re still using the 16″ circular needle, I’ll place markers at the sides of the sock, separating the top of the sock and the bottom of the sock. The decreases will be made on both sides of the markers. After a decrease round, knit one round plain (with no decreases.) Decrease and knit a plain round until there are 14 stitches on each side of the sock (top and bottom.) Now you’ll decrease every round until there are six stitches on either side and cut the yarn long enough to Kitchener stitch the sides together. Weave in all the ends and you’re pretty much finished.

I hold two strands of yarn (about 24″ long) together and use a crochet hook to make a chain that’s about four or five inches long. Thread a needle with one of the ends and pull it from the outside to the inside of the stocking just under the ribbing and tie both ends of the chain together very carefully and tightly.

I always use duplicate stitch to add the name to the top. Cousin Joanie said it wasn’t necessary but I’m going to add names if only so Santa knows which is which.

I’ve finished one green stocking and am down to the foot of the red stocking. Tomorrow I’ll pick up the white yarn for the third stocking. If I really sit and focus, I can knit these in a couple of days but I knit quickly.

Gone knitting!

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